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Common Daylily, Tawny Daylily, Orange Daylily - Hemerocallis fulva


Family: Liliaceae - Lily family Genus Common Name: Daylily Native Status: Introduced
Hemerocallis fulva - Common Daylily, Tawny Daylily, Orange Daylily. This plant was introduced from Asia for its excellent garden characteristics, and has become naturalized in 42 of the 50 states. As an escapee, it is considered weedy or invasive by some authorities.

Found in:
AL, AR, CO, CT, DC, DE, FL, GA, IA, ID, IL, IN, KS, KY, LA, MA, MD, ME, MI, MN, MO, MS, MT, NC, NE, NH, NJ, NY, OH, OR, PA, RI, SC, SD, TN, TX, UT, VA, VT, WA, WI, WV, WY
Hemerocallis fulva

Distribution of Hemerocallis fulva in the United States and Canada:
USDA Plants Distribution Map temporarily unavailable.
Blue=Native; Grey=Introduced

Map from USDA Plants Database:
USDA, NRCS. 2017. The PLANTS Database (http://plants.usda.gov, 13 Dec 2017). National Plant Data Team, Greensboro, NC 27401-4901 USA.

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Site: Flintstone, Walker County, GA Date: 2011-May-31Photographer: Gerald C. Williamson
Nikon D7000
Tamron SP 90MM f/2.8 AF Macro
The Common Daylily has 6 orange tepals.
Hemerocallis fulva

Site: Flintstone, Walker County, GA Date: 2011-May-31Photographer: Gerald C Williamson
Nikon D7000
The notable anthers are on long filaments which extend beyond the orange (sometimes red or yellow) tepals.
Click on the photo for a larger image
Hemerocallis fulva

Site: Flintstone, Walker County, GA Date: 2011-May-31Photographer: Gerald C Williamson
Nikon D7000
Daylilies have multiple flowers per plant. Since each blossom lasts only a single day (hence the name “daylily”), this allows a plant to bloom for several days. Usually there are many plants in a colony, so a colony can bloom for several weeks.
Click on the photo for a larger image
Hemerocallis fulva

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All content except USDA Plants Database map Copyright Gerald C. Williamson 2017
Photographs Copyright owned by the named photographer